National Parks

National Parks

Norfolk Island National Park is a wonderful place to see the island's unique flora and fauna, for bushwalking, bird watching and for taking in the many scenic views of Norfolk and Phillip islands from various vantage points.
Norfolk Island holds important biological significance as its flora and fauna are derived from the chance dispersal of plants and animals over vast distances of ocean.
Many species have evolved into unique, or endemic, forms due to isolation from other populations and having different evolutionary pressures.
The Norfolk Island National Park is an important component of the visitor experience, and while park management aims at providing safety and comfort for people to experience the natural beauty of the island, it also continues in the important work of rehabilitation and restoration of habitats, ecosystems and individual species.

MT PITT  
Mt. Pitt stands at 320 Meters above sea level. The lookout at the summit which is accessible by car gives you a 360° view of the whole island. A good spot to stop and enjoy the views. The panorama is something to remember, to the south you can see the outer islands of Phillip and Nepean. Take advantage of the picnic tables at the top to see magic sunsets and sunrises. Mt Pitt is also the starting point for some of the amazing walking tracks in the National Park.

Mt Pitt 360° lookout

MT BATES

I
s the highest point of Norfolk Island at 321 metres above sea level.  The Summit walk is a short walk from Mt Pitt across to Mt Bates.
The Mount Bates track skirts the top edge of the ridge between Mount Pitt and Mount Bates and continues to the base of Mount Bates from where wooden steps lead to the top. Visitors to Mount Bates are rewarded with breathtaking views over the north-west of the island. Excavations and structures at the top of Mount Bates are relics of a World War II radar station.

PHILLIP ISLAND

Just six kilometres to the south of Norfolk lies Phillip Island. In the right light, the island appears in its striking colours; rich reds and purples, subtle yellows and greys arched like rainbows through the contours of its imposing form. The island is difficult to get to and harder still to climb, but for the thousands of sea birds that regularly visit, Phillip Island is nothing short of an oasis. The island is free from feral predators and is home to a number of rare and endangered plants, all of which are thriving under the protection and management of Parks Australia.

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BIRD WATCHING

From iconic species like the green parrot and the boobook owl, Norfolk Island is home to a fascinating mixture of land, water and seabirds. The island's isolation means that a high proportion of these birds are found nowhere else in the world.
Please do not feed the birds. Wild birds find their own natural foods like insects, plants and small mammals. Other foods can make them sick.

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CAPTAIN COOK MONUMENT

When Captain James Cook landed on Norfolk in 1774 he explored only one segment on the north coast. A monument to Captain James Cook and a scenic lookout have been erected on this northern part of the coast where he landed with his officers - you'll get a spectacular view of the coastline from here. Access to the lookout is via Duncombe Bay Road. Picnic tables, barbecues and toilet facilities are provided at the scenic headland.The Bridle Track can be accessed down the grassy slope from the monument. The Bridle Track follows the coastline and offers views of the many islets, eventually linking with the Red Stone Link Track which takes you to the Bird Rock lookout. When Captain James Cook landed on Norfolk in 1774 he explored only one segment on the north coast. A monument to Captain James Cook and a scenic lookout have been erected on this northern part of the coast where he landed with his officers - you'll get a spectacular view of the coastline from here. Access to the lookout is via Duncombe Bay Road. Picnic tables, barbecues and toilet facilities are provided at the scenic headland.
The Bridle Track can be accessed down the grassy slope from the monument. The Bridle Track follows the coastline and offers views of the many islets, eventually linking with the Red Stone Link Track which takes you to the Bird Rock lookout. 

When Captain James Cook landed on Norfolk in 1774 he explored only one segment on the north coast. A monument to Captain James Cook and a scenic lookout have been erected on this northern part of the coast where he landed with his officers - you'll get a spectacular view of the coastline from here. Access to the lookout is via Duncombe Bay Road. Picnic tables, barbecues and toilet facilities are provided at the scenic headland.

The Bridle Track can be accessed down the grassy slope from the monument. The Bridle Track follows the coastline and offers views of the many islets, eventually linking with the Red Stone Link Track which takes you to the Bird Rock lookout.

- See more at: http://www.parksaustralia.gov.au/norfolk/people-place/cook.html#sthash.nXpFMf6R.dpuf

When Captain James Cook landed on Norfolk in 1774 he explored only one segment on the north coast. A monument to Captain James Cook and a scenic lookout have been erected on this northern part of the coast where he landed with his officers - you'll get a spectacular view of the coastline from here. Access to the lookout is via Duncombe Bay Road. Picnic tables, barbecues and toilet facilities are provided at the scenic headland.

The Bridle Track can be accessed down the grassy slope from the monument. The Bridle Track follows the coastline and offers views of the many islets, eventually linking with the Red Stone Link Track which takes you to the Bird Rock lookout.

- See more at: http://www.parksaustralia.gov.au/norfolk/people-place/cook.html#sthash.nXpFMf6R.dpuf

Captain Cook lookout

BUSH WALKING

The walking trails of Norfolk Island National Park are the perfect way to get some exercise and see Norfolk’s unique landscape. Tracks guide you through lush palm forests and stands of Norfolk Island pine, leading to stunning vistas of the island and the surrounding ocean. Many endemic and endangered species can be spotted by those with a quiet approach and a keen eye. You may even see the rare green parrot. Tracks are well marked by signs and have a range of grades and lengths to suit all fitness levels.

Captain cook track

BOTANICAL GARDENS

The stunning walks through the Botanic Garden provide a fabulous opportunity to experience the diverse flora on Norfolk Island. Suited to a range of fitness levels, there is a walk to suit everyone. The Discovery Centre is also located in the Botanical gardens. There is a viewing deck that provides a stunning view back to Mt Pitt. 

Botanical gardens


REPTILES

The Lord Howe Island skink Oligosoma lichenigera and the Lord Howe Island gecko Christinus guentheri are endemic to the Norfolk and Lord Howe Island groups. Due to predation by feral animals neither exist on Norfolk Island but both can be found on Phillip Island.

INSECTS

A number of endemic invertebrates occur including one species of Collembola, 30 moths, 11 booklice, 65 beetles and one particularly impressive centipede which grows up to 150 mm long and 17 mm wide. The centipede Cormocephalus coynei was recorded on Phillip Island by King in 1792, but it was not described until recently. It is restricted to Phillip and Nepean Islands.

To download walking track maps, and information on the bird life and Phillip Island visit